Becoming a Partner Organization & Site Placement

Information for Site Placements

We invite your organization to consider serving as one of the service placements for Quaker Voluntary Service (QVS), a dynamic program providing opportunities for transformative service in peace, justice and community organizing contexts.

QVS is open to young adults interested in the intersection of faith and activism, living in intentional Quaker community, and openly engaging questions of faith and service in the world. QVS Fellows live together in simple intentional community. QVS partners with agencies and organizations that offer direct support to marginalized individuals and communities, and that strive to transform unjust structures. QVS places energetic and committed young people in full time positions in these agencies for 11 months (early September through late July). These QVS Fellows receive housing, a food stipend, access to health insurance, training, and spiritual support from QVS.

This year long experience has the potential to orient Fellows to a whole life committed to service and justice. To see the list of the organizations we currently partner with, see Current Placements.

Georgia Sierra Club

Founded by legendary conservationist John Muir in 1892, the Sierra Club is now the nation's largest and most influential grassroots environmental organization. What makes the Sierra Club unique is that we have the grassroots power to win with 2.7 million members and supporters, 64 Chapters, and over 400 groups. Our successes range from protecting millions of acres of wilderness to helping pass the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and Endangered Species Act. More recently, we've made history by leading the charge to move away from the dirty fossil fuels that cause climate disruption and toward a clean energy economy.

Job Title: Ready for 100 Organizer

Builds public support to accomplish the goals of the Ready for 100 campaign, which is aimed at getting the City of Atlanta to commit to a fair and just plan to transition to 100% clean energy. Recruits and trains volunteer leaders, develops relationships with the community other organizations, and officials that can influence change. Increases the number of volunteer supporters that turnout for events and participate in achieving the campaign objectives.

The Organizer is responsible for recruiting, engaging, and motivating volunteers and large numbers of new people to take repeated action that furthers Sierra Club’s Ready for 100 campaign or program goals. Identifies and develops volunteers to take on the role of team leaders and build grassroots power and networks.

Identifies and builds alliances with other organizations which can influence decision-makers. Regularly works outside of the office and without direct supervision to communicate with officials, the media and the public. Travels to relevant communities and locations to implement campaign plans..

Local Enterprise Assistance Fund

Local Enterrpise Assistance Fund (LEAF)'s mission is to promote human and economic development by providing financing and development assistance to cooperatives and social purpose ventures that create and save jobs for low-income people. LEAF lends nationally, with a focus on community-owned natural food cooperatives that create high quality jobs and provide access to healthy food in urban and rural communities; low-income cooperative housing developments; and worker-owned firms and other community-based businesses and social enterprises.

The QVS Fellow at LEAF, depending of their level of financial experience could either support the credit manager with underwriting and analysis, or more widely support the organization through grant writing, communications, and loan documentation. The Fellow will have opportunity to immerse themselves in the work of mitigating wealth inequality and supporting the work of various cooperative groups and organizations.

ReStores of Habitat for Humanity

Habitat for Humanity Portland/Metro East revitalizes neighborhoods, builds affordable and sustainable homes, and empowers families through successful homeownership. The ReStore arm of Habitat generates revenue to contribute to this effort by taking in donated items to sell for a profit to support homebuilding costs.

Habitat for Humanity Portland/Metro East is an independent affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International, a global home building movement and top private home builder in the country. By providing affordable housing, home repairs, skilled construction training, financial education, and volunteer opportunities, the organization has transformed millions of lives, helped stabilize communities and fostered economic vitality in the region. Habitat welcomes people from all walks of life to partner in serving families in need and creating a better community for everyone who lives here.

Position: ReStore Associate

The ReStore Assistant is responsible for working with other staff and volunteers to manage all aspects of day-to-day retail operations as directed.

ReStore Assistants are expected to perform all tasks safely, efficiently, and effectively, and to use polite and respectful communication with staff, volunteers and customers.

Key Responsibilities
•Train volunteers to complete ReStore tasks and support with reviews and follow-up
•Greet donors and inspect donations; accept items that meet our guidelines and decline those that do not
•Clean and price donations; place priced items on the sales floor
•Clean and organize all store and receiving areas, including break and rest rooms, and outdoor areas
•Greet and assist customers in the store, including loading, measuring and answering questions
•Cashier and manage opening and closing of store

Required Knowledge, Skills and Abilities
•Work as a team with staff and volunteers, following the lead and direction of senior staff
•Maintain a clean and organized work environment
•Manage time well, such as timely arrival for shift, reporting hours, taking appropriate breaks, and managing donation flow urgency
•Use tools and equipment, such as a forklift, pallet jacks and dollies to move donations
•Follow and enforce safety requirements with other staff and volunteers
•Master communication tools, such as telephone, email and 2-way radio
•Adapt to a changing work environment; learn new operations skills as program develops
•Dress appropriately, have a neat appearance and wear ReStore logo and nametag

Other duties as assigned, including taking a leadership role as needed

Work Environment/Physical Demand
This job operates in an open, warehouse retail environment. This position is very active and requires standing, walking, bending, kneeling, stooping, crouching, crawling, and climbing all day. The employee must frequently lift, move and/or load items over 50 pounds.

Southern Center for Human Rights

The Southern Center for Human Rights (SCHR) is a nonprofit law firm dedicated to providing legal representation to people facing the death penalty, challenging human rights violations in prisons and jails, seeking through litigation and advocacy to improve legal representation for poor people accused of crimes, and advocating for criminal justice reform on behalf of those affected by the system in the Southern United States. SCHR was founded in 1976 by ministers and activists in response to the United States Supreme Court’s reinstatement of the death penalty that year and to the horrendous conditions in Southern prisons and jails. The organization’s attorneys and investigators struggled alongside civil rights organizations, families, and faith-based organizations to protect the human rights of people of color, poor people, and others in the criminal justice system in the South. Complementing our capital litigation, SCHR has a strong civil litigation practice that is able to bring impact litigation challenging the systemic deficiencies revealed through our capital litigation. Some of SCHR’s largest wins have resulted in an overhaul of South Carolina’s entire prison system; major renovations in Louisiana’s Angola Prison death row; shutting down Alabama’s Morgan County jail; and improved HIV care in Limestone Prison in Alabama, including an 80% drop in AIDS deaths.

The Southern Center for Human Rights (SCHR) is excited to invite a Quaker Fellow to join our vibrant legal team as a Criminal Justice Reform Intake Specialist (“Specialist”). The Specialist will work closely with attorneys and investigators to respond to challenges and concerns from people who are under criminal justice control and challenge unconstitutional or illegal criminal justice practices and the application of the death penalty in Georgia and Alabama.


9to5, founded in 1973, is a national membership-based organization committed to strengthening the ability of low-income women to win economic justice. 9to5 combines advocacy, public education, civic engagement, grassroots organizing, policy campaigns and leadership development to improve employment policies for women and families. Their mission is to build a movement to achieve economic justice by engaging directly affected women to improve working conditions. While they work to win immediate improvements in conditions for low-income women, they also seek to address the root causes of poverty among women and their families, and to focus on the links between different types of oppression. They connect injustice in the workplace with the systemic discrimination from which it stems, and relate both to the need for creation and protection of family supporting jobs for all. They also work for social change within our organization and community by electing our leadership from our constituency, operating in a democratic manner, connecting local and global issues, working in collaboration with other local organizations, and building communication and trust across diverse constituencies.

The QVS Fellow position is as the Helpline and Chapter Organizer which is split between three roles. Half of the Fellow’s time will be devoted to outreach and member engagement for the Atlanta chapter’s issue campaigns (Ban the Box, Election Connection, and the Family Care Act). A quarter of the Fellow’s time will be spent managing the Job Survival Helpline, providing information to our callers about their rights on the job and assistance navigating their options to deal with workplace issues. We provide in-depth training on employment law and resources available to our callers, as well as side-by-side on the job training for practice taking calls. The final quarter of the Fellow’s time will be supporting the Action Network, including engaging helpline callers and other new contacts to provide tools and resources to build support for working women’s issues in their own communities.

The American Friends Service Committee (AFSC)

The American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) Logo
The American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) is a Quaker organization that promotes lasting peace with justice, as a practical expression of faith in action. Drawing on continuing spiritual insights and working with people of many backgrounds, we nurture the seeds of change and respect for human life that transform social relations and systems.

The Atlanta Economic Justice Program works with low income, underserved, and vulnerable communities through grassroots organizing and fostering community leadership to build a culture of activism, build coalition, and build resistance to economic injustice.
Leveraging a relevant community issue around economic injustice such as home eviction and foreclosure, mass corporation lay-offs, declining standards of living, lack of protections for renters and small business owners, we bring communities together to build public, community-based campaigns to draw connections between local economic injustice to larger systems of violence and oppression that control our minds, bodies, and communities

Attend staff meetings, help facilitate projects

  • Help organize, outreach, and facilitate community meetings in neighborhoods surrounding Turner Field
  • Preparing materials for workshops
  • Door to Door canvassing in NPU-V
  • Data entry
  • Networking with grassroots community groups in NPU-V
Atlanta Habitat for Humanity

Atlanta Habitat for Humanity partners with corporations, organizations, foundations, and individuals to build 50-60 affordable, green, quality homes each year for first-time, qualified, homebuyers. These homes are sold with a zero interest mortgage. Since 1983, we have built over 1,200 homes for more than 4,000 family members. Atlanta Habitat concentrates its services within the city of Atlanta and Fulton County to families with 30-80% Average Median Income.

The QVS Fellow position is as Family Services Outreach Assistant. The primary duties and responsibilities of this position are: to assist in the recruitment of qualified families by researching outreach opportunities, networking, and presenting program information to targeted audiences; to assist with information sessions and application workshops by providing administrative support and making presentations as requested; to follow up with prospective families to schedule them for an application workshop and apply for the home purchase program; to assist with homeowner education as requested to identify instructors, schedule classes and provide administrative support to the program; to assist with the implementation of a strategy designed to increase the level of community involvement among homeowners; and to research community resources for homeowners and participate in the creation and publication of 2 homeowner newsletters.

Boston Healthcare for the Homeless Program (BHCHP)

For 30 years, Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP) has been committed to a singular, powerful mission: to provide and assure access to the highest quality health care for Boston’s homeless men, women, and children. Over 12,000 homeless men, women, and children are cared for by BHCHP each year. They are committed to ensuring that every one of these individuals has access to comprehensive health care, from preventative dental care to cancer treatment. Their clinicians, case managers, and behavioral health professionals work in more than 60 locations to deliver the highest quality healthcare to some of our community’s most vulnerable — and most resilient — citizens. These health disparities are compounded by the barriers they face in accessing the care and services they need, often rooted in their daily struggles to access food, shelter, clothing, and transportation. Without the safety of a stable home, health care can easily become a distant priority, causing preventable and treatable illnesses to go diagnosed and minor symptoms to rapidly escalate into health crisis. BHCHP has become a nationally recognized model of innovative health care for homeless patients.

The QVS Fellowship position is as a Case Manager and Health Educator. The Fellow will be responsible for making referrals and providing resources to patients in need of services that support their overall health, including detoxes, transitional housing programs, food programs, transportation assistance, etc. The Fellow will help support, assist, and serve patients in myriad ways.

Bread & Roses Community (BRCF)

Bread & Roses Community (BRCF) is a unique partnership of donors and activists who share a vision for a just society in which power and resources are distributed equitably. Bread & Roses was originally founded in 1970 as the People’s Fund – a radical anti-establishment social justice fund – and was re-established in 1977 as Bread & Roses Community Fund. Bread & Roses raises money from individual donors in the community to provide grants, technical assistance, and leadership development to constituent-led, grassroots, social change organizations in the Philadelphia region. The grants BRCF gives are raised and distributed by a cross-race, cross-class, inter-generational group of community members. Bread & Roses centers all of its work around its motto: change, not charity.

The QVS Fellow at Bread & Roses will work as a Program Associate under the Director of Programs. The position will include: researching and meeting with grassroots community organizers like Ramona Africa and other local leaders; reviewing and cataloging grant proposals from a wide array of community organizations working on a wide range of issues including immigrant rights, racial justice, environmental justice, and lgbt rights; helping to design, write, and disseminate the quarterly newsletter and regular email communications; managing Bread & Roses’ social media profiles; creating and implementing programming for current BRCF grantees and other grassroots community groups, and planning and implementing a range of special events for the wider Bread & Roses community, including our annual Tribute to Change event that focuses on a different issue each year. This year’s Town Hall explored the intersection of gentrification and environmental racism. There is no typical day in the life of a Bread & Roses Community Fund QVS Fellow, and we like to think that’s what makes it so exciting!

Cambridge Friends School

Cambridge Friends School is a co-educational elementary and middle school (pre-K – grade 8) established in 1961 under the care of Friends Meeting at Cambridge, Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). It is the mission of Cambridge Friends School to provide an outstanding education. Guided by Quaker principles, we engage students in meaningful academic learning within a caring community strongly committed to social justice. We expect all students to develop their intellectual, physical, creative, and spiritual potential and, through the example of their lives, to challenge oppression and to contribute to justice and understanding in the world.

The QVS Fellow will serve as a Teaching Assistant at CFS, partnering with teachers and students in a classroom to support their work in developing lesson plans, instructing, integrating social justice and issues of community and equity into the curriculum, and participating in the life of the school. We would designate a particular classroom and age group assignment based on the interests and experience of the Fellow. Qualifications: Fellow should be passionate, compassionate, collaborative, reflective, and enjoy working with others – adults and children. We are a learning community and grow through working with one another, regardless of experience level. We all would gain through partnering with an individual and organization dedicated to Quaker service. The Quaker belief in the “Inner Light” leads to faith in the ability of every member of the School community to reach her or his full potential. We honor and are enriched by a community with diverse gifts and talents.

Fair Food / Greensgrow

*Greensgrow and Fair Food are in the exploratory phases of merging their non-profits*

Fair Food was founded in 2000 with the goal of slowing the rapid loss of productive farmland by finding new wholesale buyers and simplifying delivery logistics so that food produced in our region could get to consumers’ plates. Fair Food also works to strengthen the public’s access to locally produced food via The Fair Food Farmstand at Reading Terminal Market, a year-round, retail outlet for all-local products. The Farmstand carries a variety of fresh produce, meats, poultry, dairy, eggs, cheese and value-added products from organic and sustainable farms within a 150-mile radius of Philadelphia. Open seven days a week, the goals of the Farmstand are to educate consumers about the benefits of buying local, to provide the region with a point of access to sustainably-raised food, and to support farmers by providing a market for local products. The Farmstand provides subsidized access to fresh, local food for SNAP-participants through our Double Dollars program. Double Dollars is a double value coupon program which provides SNAP customers with a dollar-for-dollar match (up to $10 per week) on their SNAP purchases.

Greensgrow was founded in 1997 as a hydroponic lettuce farm on a former brownfield site in North Philadelphia. Today Greensgrow is a $2 million social enterprise committed to strengthening the local food economy, and has emerged as a nationally recognized leader in urban agriculture. Greensgrow operates two community-based garden centers, a 750-member Farm Share program, retail farmstands, numerous education events and workshops, and a Community Kitchen for emerging food entrepreneurs.The Food Access Coordinator (FAC) will be shared jointly by Greensgrow and Fair Food, assisting in the development and daily operations of our respective food access programs. The FAC will spend roughly half of their time managing Fair Food’s Double Dollars Program at their farmstand location in Reading Terminal Market, tracking and reporting coupon redemption and distribution rates and promoting this program to underserved Philadelphia communities. Double Dollars is a Double Value Coupon Program (DVCP) that serves individuals using SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) benefits, by offering a dollar-for dollar match on groceries purchased at the Farmstand. The FAC will also spend roughly half of their time at Greensgrow, coordinating the implementation and management of their SNAP Share program, which provides subsidized weekly produce boxes to families experiencing food insecurity.

QVS Fellow Position-

Fair Food-

  • Track Double Dollars data and report as needed to program funders
  • Learn about food access initiatives across Philadelphia to be a better resource to customer inquiries
  • Share Double Dollars information and food access resources with Farmstand customers, volunteers and staff
  • Serve as point of contact for all Double Dollars inquiries


  • Track SNAP Share data and report as needed to program funders
  • Help process and manage member payment and tracking information
  • Assist with member recruitment and outreach
  • Assist with SNAP Share distribution markets

Joint Expectations
Attend related workshops and conferences as needed
In conjunction with Development teams and communications staff, promote both programs and identify opportunities for funding

Bachelor’s degree
Experience working with food access initiatives preferred
Experience working on farms preferred
Excellent organizational and project management skills
Ability to communicate effectively with customers, partner organizations, colleagues and funders
Ability to create structure out of ambiguity
Sense of humor
Experience with food retail a plus
Ability to meet physical demands of the job, including standing for long periods of time, bending and lifting up to 50 pounds

Friends School of Atlanta

Friends School Atlanta's mission is to provide challenging academics in a diverse environment, drawing on the Quaker testimonies, or values, of simplicity, peace, integrity, community, equality and stewardship to empower our students to go out into the world with conscience, conviction and compassion. FSA, opened in 1991 as a model for diversity and with the belief that all students have within themselves unique capacities for learning and achievement.

The school currently serves 170 students and employs 44 faculty and staff. The learning program provides opportunities for students to achieve their highest academic levels. In a supportive learning environment, students develop their capacities through independent thought, service and responsible action, thereby fostering life-long learning, self-confidence and respect for others. We provide a caring, cooperative atmosphere encouraging students to support each other as equals, and discourage that which would set one student above another.

Quaker values, based in the worth of each person, are reaffirmed in the school by listening and negotiating in the spirit of unity. These same values lead us to strive for diversity among students, families, faculty and staff, the Board of Trustees and in all areas of school life. As students incorporate the value of human respect into their lives, we believe they will take their wisdom and turn it toward social issues that extend beyond the immediate community to the world at large.

FSA serves a diverse population of students including some students with learning disabilities in an inclusive classroom model. Approximately 45% of students identify as students of color, 30% receive financial assistance to support their enrollment, and FSA has long been a welcoming school community for LGBTQ families. The QVS Fellow would support students and teachers in a wide variety of ways and depending upon their areas of interest. Past QVS have taught in classrooms, monitored playground, originated clubs, created service learning opportunities, mentored individual students, researched grant opportunities, supported refugee Quaker families in their matriculation to the school.

Georgia WAND

Georgia Women’s Action for New Directions (WAND) is a statewide, women-led, grassroots organization, which strives to educate women, people of color, and the general public and decision makers about the need to reduce militarism and violence and redirect excessive military spending toward unmet human and environmental needs.

Georgia WAND’s Program Areas:
1. To complete a three-year environmental monitoring and outreach program in Burke County, GA and more generally environmental contamination from the nuclear industry, both weapons and energy
2. To increase the civic engagement of women, people of color, and youth in locations affected by the nuclear industry and in locations where Pentagon spending far outweighs resources for public services, such as education and housing
3. To build an educated constituency that connects the dots between extreme levels of military funding and the federal budget.

Georgia WAND co-designs strategies with people in communities who are directly affected by our focus issues; and we follow their leadership. Our constituency spans age, race, geography, and other markers of difference; and we are working to be inclusive of all women of color, transgender women, women throughout the state, working women, and young women. As an organization of action, we raise our voices to speak out against injustice; and we take our passion, knowledge, and experiences to the streets, the classrooms, the boardroom, the capitol steps, the state legislative body, the halls of Congress, and beyond. We support our constituents addressing their concerns by providing issue education, leadership training, and engagement opportunities with different agencies and public officials on budget and policy intervention points; conducting grassroots organizing and civic engagement efforts; and participating in coalition work.

The QVS Fellow will serve as a WAND Program Assistant:

• Supporting fundraising and programming activities
• Create reports and assist in program research as needed
• Answering phones, fielding calls, acting as a general point of contact for the organization
• Support staff in the drafting of educational materials, communications, program materials and grants
• Provide administrative support including filing, data entry, update membership database
• Calling volunteers, members, and partners
• Assisting with civic engagement work, such as voter registration and Get Out The Vote initiatives
• Supporting lobby days and giving public comments at government hearings
• Strong interpersonal communication skills
• Strong oral and written communication skills
• General computer skills: Microsoft Word, sending and receiving emails, online research
• Ability to work well with all levels of staff with a positive, solution-oriented approach

*Women, people of color, LGBTQ and immigrant individuals are encouraged to apply.

We are looking for a person with exceptional organizational, administrative, communication and people skills.

Interfaith Center of Greater Philadelphia

In order to promote social harmony and inter-religious understanding, the Interfaith Center of Greater Philadelphia equips individuals and communities for interfaith engagement, builds collaborative relationships, and stands in solidarity with our diverse neighbors.

Since our founding in 2004, the Interfaith Center has challenged Philadelphians to dare to understand one another. Our bold vision is to have our region reflect the vibrancy of a religiously diverse democracy, one in which all people are valued, distinctive traditions are welcomed, and people of diverse backgrounds collaborate to shape a just and compassionate society. In our first 14 years, we have served over 30,000 individuals and partnered with more than 325 religious congregations and institutions, educational institutions, and civic and service organizations. To this day, the Interfaith Center remains one of the few organizations of its kind across the country. We’ve been called upon at the highest levels of city government and local business to help create programs that promote understanding, cooperation, and relationships between individuals of different faiths.

Community Fellows Program: The Interfaith Center is seeking a Community Programs Fellow who is passionate about grassroots interfaith relations work and has excellent communications skills. The Fellow will work in collaboration with a diverse team of Interfaith Center staff and volunteers to carry out agency programs and initiatives. All Interfaith Center programs are intended to equip individuals with the skills and knowledge for interfaith engagement, build relationships of trust and solidarity, and promote interfaith understanding in the public sphere. Specific projects will be determined based on the intern's skills and interests, as well as the Center's most pressing needs. These may include: (a) Coordinating, co-leading, and evaluating community events, educational programs and training workshops such as our Interfaith Ally / Bystander Intervention Workshop, a community conversation on the intersection of Race & Faith, and/or a neighborhood-based series of congregational open houses; (b) Planning, organizing, and facilitating an Alternative Break for college students -- or similar programs for high school students, (c) Coordinating, recruiting, and participating in our annual Bike Ride for Understanding and/or other community fundraising events and projects, (d) Assisting with the Interfaith Center's communications: website, social media, print materials, technology, and multimedia resources, (e) Researching and developing educational resources on religious diversity and pluralism in the United States, (f) Supporting our Zones of Peace initiative by Interviewing and recognizing nonprofits and congregations in our region doing peace-building work ..... and other diverse opportunities for skill building and engagement.

International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War

International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW) is a non-partisan federation of national medical organizations in 66 countries, representing tens of thousands of doctors, medical students, other health workers, and concerned citizens who share the common goal of creating a more peaceful and secure world freed from the threat of nuclear annihilation.

IPPNW was founded in 1980 by physicians from the United States and Soviet Union sharing a commitment to prevent nuclear war. Citing the first principal of medicine — doctors must prevent what they cannot treat — physicians from around the world came together to explain the medical facts about nuclear war to policy makers and to the public, and to advocate for the elimination of nuclear weapons from the world’s arsenals.

IPPNW received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1985. Although the Cold War ended with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the US and Russia retained thousands of nuclear weapons ready to launch at a moment’s notice. Studies now show that a limited nuclear war using a fraction of the world’s nuclear weapons would damage the Earth’s ecosystems and could result in the starvation of as many as two billion people in a “nuclear famine.”

Nuclear Abolition Program Assistant for International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War
International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW) is looking for a self-motivated, skilled individual to assist in outreach to medical professionals, allied groups, and individuals in sixty-six nations in support of the UN Treaty to Prohibit Nuclear Weapons (TPNW), which passed on July 7, 2017. IPPNW, through its doctors and allies, will be working to educate policy makers and the public about the catastrophic consequences of nuclear war and secure the signature and ratification of fifty nations worldwide to bring the treaty into force.

The Nuclear Abolition Program Assistant, under the supervision of the Nuclear Program Director, will be in direct communication with chapter leaders, student leaders, and other activists from around the world, working together on this critical project. The position will involve some routine office work in addition to arranging logistics for conferences on the medical effects of nuclear war and meetings between advocates and government officials. The Fellow working with IPPNW will also work with Greater Boston Physicians for Social Responsibility in planning a fundraising and speaking event in the fall. This job may involve foreign travel.

We seek someone who believes deeply in the cause of nuclear weapons abolition. Skills in graphic design, using social media in advocacy, promotional writing, and having facility in more than one language, would be very helpful but not essential.


JUNTOS is a community-led, Latinx immigrant organization in South Philadelphia fighting for our human rights as workers, parents, youth, and immigrants. We believe that every human being has the right to a quality education and the freedom to live with dignity regardless of immigration status.

Juntos combines leadership development, community organizing, and focused collaborations with other community-based and advocacy organizations to build the power of our community members so they may be active agents of change and work against their own oppression. Juntos started in September 2002 as a volunteer project involving female clients of Women Organized Against Rape (WOAR) who were looking for more diverse and full services to suit their needs. During its first year of operation, Juntos was housed in space donated by St. Thomas Aquinas Church at 18th and Morris Streets. In January 2004, we were able to open our own office, the first Latinx community center in South Philadelphia, called la Casa de los Soles.

Development Assistant & Volunteer Coordinator:

L’Arche Portland

L’Arche Portland is a faith-based organization in which people with and without intellectual disabilities create home and build community together. The focus of life in L’Arche is creating home with adults with disabilities, rather than just providing services to them. L’Arche believes in the power of relationship in community to transform lives and bring real home and genuine love to those whose deepest suffering is not their disability, but their experience of isolation and loneliness. L’Arche is a leader in demonstrating to Oregonians the quality care and companionship that is possible. It distinguishes itself by caring about people, rather than caring for people. L’Arche imparts to the broader community its vision of the unique value of every person, our need for one another, and the transforming power of mutual relationships.

The QVS Fellow will serve as a Live-Out Assistant. L’Arche Assistants work with the other Assistants and the Community Leadership Team to create and support community life in our homes. This position requires a mature individual able to maintain confidentiality while dealing with a variety of personalities and the tensions and conflicts that result. L’Arche Assistants must learn to develop competence in a wide range of areas including interpersonal relations, household planning, and personal time management. This position requires a commitment to live out the mission of L’Arche Portland and a call to share life with people with disabilities.

Massachusetts Climate Action Network (MCAN)

Massachusetts Climate Action Network (MCAN) Our role as a facilitator of municipal-level action is unique among Massachusetts environmental groups. We empower our local chapters by enhancing communication, promoting town-level projects that improve communities, decreasing climate change-causing pollution, and reducing development time for those projects. MCAN speaks on behalf of all chapters to improve Massachusetts energy and climate policies and programs.


    • Support local MCAN chapters to implement change at the municipal level. Municipalities have been the most active level of government to fight climate change on a worldwide basis.
    • Advocate at the state and regional level for policies and programs that will benefit municipalities and their citizens.
    • Facilitate peer learning and tool-sharing to effectively replicate successful programs from one municipality to the next.
    • Work with partner organizations, including neighborhood and faith associations and affinity groups, to help them take action on climate change.

Founded in 2000, MCAN has more than 40 chapters across MA, supported by one full time staffer (the Executive Director), paid interns, an active board, and numerous volunteers.

Since our founding, we have helped our chapters accomplish local work ranging from climate action plans and greenhouse gas inventories to running solar buying programs and implementing energy efficiency in public buildings. At the state level, we have successfully advocated for passage and implementation of laws to help cities and towns do good work on climate, such as the green communities act and last year’s innovative clean energy bill.

The QVS Fellow position will have two major points of focus:
1. MCAN has, in partnership with the Mass Power Forward Coalition, developed a toolkit to help those interested in making a difference on clean energy at the local level implement projects and policies that are proven to move the needle on climate change. Chapters and local groups need coaching and mentoring to help build their teams, make choices about what to pursue first, and think through how they will get it done. The fellow would help these folks do all of those things, and therefore help towns and teams move from start to finish on projects and policies.
2. MCAN’s chapters around the state have been doing amazing work, some of them for decades. They have had real tangible results at the local level through actions like getting solar on their capped landfills, ensuring their communities have better transportation and walkability, and saving their neighbors and town governments money through energy efficiency. However, this information is not captured effectively: we know some of what towns have done, but not all. And we don’t have the stories of how our members made the decision to do their projects, we don’t have pictures of all of the projects or the teams, and we don’t have the crucial information about how much they are saving in terms of climate change or money. The fellow would help capture this information and help chapters and members share their stories.

Metrowest Worker Center-Casa

Metrowest Worker Center-Casa is an immigrant worker-led organization based in the MetroWest area of Boston, Massachusetts, which organizes to defend and expand the labor, civil, and human rights of all workers. The organization is purposely multilingual and multiracial, and works to unite communities that unscrupulous employers seek to divide. They combine direct action and legal strategies to combat wage theft, allowing the Metrowest Worker Center to recover millions of dollars in unpaid wages, while building worker power. They support and organize injured workers to rebuild their lives and develop their leadership in their community. They assist workers to fight workplace sexual harassment and racial profiling. Allies participate in organizing communities of privilege to support immigrant-led campaigns, fundraise, take action against unjust laws and policies, and dismantle racism and xenophobia in their own communities.

The QVS Fellow will assist with Metrowest Worker Center-CASA’s (MWC-CASA) coordination of health care delivery to injured immigrant workers; outreach to faith community allies in building support of MWC-CASA and other immigrant worker centers in the region; support wage theft campaigns and legislative campaigns; and general support of the functioning of a small organization. The project offers the opportunity to engage extensively with MWC immigrant membership, as well as participate in public outreach. Precise job description will be defined jointly with project coordinator, taking into account the Fellow’s language abilities, skills & interests. Additional language skills, Spanish and/or Portuguese, a plus.

Nationalities Service Center (NSC)

Nationalities Service Center (NSC) is Philadelphia’s leading immigrant and refugee service organization empowering individuals to build a self-sustaining and dignified future. The Nationalities Service Center (NSC), believes that immigrants and refugees are a critical part of the fabric of life in the United States, and it is our vision that all immigrants and refugees achieve a life of dignity, safety, stability, sustainable opportunities and meaningful connections to their communities. To this end, NSC provides comprehensive services to immigrants and refugees, including legal protections, community integration, access to health and wellness services, and opportunities to achieve English language proficiency. Their dedicated staff are committed to ensuring that each of our clients receives high-quality holistic care and work together to refer clients to internal and external services based on the individual’s needs. Today, NSC serves 5,000 immigrants and refugees each year from over 100 countries around the world. They are the largest non-sectarian organization in the Greater Philadelphia area which provides comprehensive services in the areas of language access and proficiency, legal protections and remedies, community transition and integration, access to health and wellness, and job readiness training to immigrants and refugees.

The QVS Fellow will serve as the Legal Assistant, which provides direct legal services to clients in immigration law matters under the supervision of the Director of Legal Services. The Legal Assistant conducts legal intakes with clients, presents cases for analysis and review to the attorneys on staff, performs factual and legal research, completes applications for relief, meets regularly with clients, and speaks to community groups. The Legal Assistant works with low-income immigrants and refugees from diverse national origins. The clients are women, men and children; all age groups; all races/ethnicities; and varied language abilities. The Fellow should have strong communication skills, the ability to work well with people from many backgrounds, education levels, and traditions, the ability to work both individually and as a team, and have a strong interest in serving low-income immigrants.

New Economy Coalition

New Economy Coalition exists to build the collective power of groups across the US. We are a growing network of more than 200 member organizations. We are organizers, researchers, workers, lenders, farmers, storytellers, artists, cooperative members, union members, local business leaders, community organizations, and more.

In collaboration with our allies in other social movements, we are working to make the new economy a powerful force in the lives of ordinary people. We are growing existing projects to scale. We are changing public policy. We are bringing this movement to the mainstream, shifting culture and the national conversation about the economy.

The QVS Fellow will work in two organizations (NEC and one of the others):
1. New Economy Coalition (NEC): The fellow will spend 3 days/week working to support NEC’s working groups. One of the resources NEC provides to its 200+ member organizations is the ability to join working groups to facilitate peer-learning and relationship-building. The QVS Fellow will help to coordinate and build the capacity of working groups across three departments: development, communications, and membership. Specific tasks will include research on relevant press and media hits, helping building a shared communications database for NEC members, helping build NEC’s resource library and Member Map, grant research and prospecting, and other projects determined by interest, skill and organizational need, under the supervision of the Development Director.
2. Ujima Project: This urban hub run by and servicing communities of color is recruiting a fellow of color to develop a faith-based anchor institution strategy and explore a faith-based cooperative purchasing initiative, under the supervision of core staff. Fellow must have an interest and experience in faith based communities.
3. Center for Cooperative Development and Solidarity-CCDS: An umbrella organization for worker cooperatives run by Latina Immigrant women; the bilingual (Spanish required) fellow would work to develop and support the 5 projects being launched.
Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility

Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility was founded in 1981 by a group of local physicians and scientists who advocated against nuclear weapons and for the cleanup of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. We are the local affiliate of the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War which was awarded the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize. Guided by the values and expertise of medicine and public health, Oregon PSR seeks a healthy, just and peaceful world for present and future generations by protecting human life from the gravest threats to health and survival.

Specific programs include advocating for a healthy climate and environment, ending nuclear power, and promoting peaceful alternatives to militarism, nuclear weapons, and gun violence. In addition to bringing the health perspective to issues of social responsibility, we intentionally prioritize the voices and needs of communities of color. We work to incorporate racial and immigrant justice into our environmental, anti-nuclear, and peacebuilding work.
The QVS Fellow will assist with outreach, planning, and management of projects within our program areas. This will include: Coordinating our annual peace writing scholarship for Oregon high school students; Doing outreach for our annual Hiroshima and Nagasaki commemoration; Assisting in grassroots lobbying efforts on energy issues at local, state, and national levels; Staffing our outreach table at community events and rallies; Representing Oregon PSR at multi-organizational campaigns and events; Assisting with social media and earned media outreach; Networking with health professional and health professional student organizations; and assisting with organizational fundraisers, events and other activities.
Outside In

Outside In‘s mission is to assist homeless youth and other low-income and marginalized people move toward improved health and self-sufficiency. Outside In, established in 1968, has continually revised services to respond to changing client needs. We operate a Federally Qualified Health Center and are state-certified for both mental health treatment and alcohol and drug treatment services. Current programs include a Clinic and Homeless Youth Department. The Clinic is a cutting-edge blend of western and alternative medicine. It is a teaching site for Oregon Health Sciences University, and provides western medicine, naturopathic, acupuncture, Chinese herbal, chiropractic, and dental care. The Clinic provides healthcare five days per week and 28,000 visits annually. The Youth Department serves about 800 homeless youth annually. A Day Program provides safety off the streets and basic needs resources, including 3 meals per day, 6 days per week. It also offers other wraparound supports including case management, QueerZone supports for LGBTQ youth, mental health treatment, alcohol and drug treatment, 30 units of on-site housing, 50 units of housing in the community, our “Urban Ed” Alternative School, an employment center, and the Virginia Woof Dog Daycare/Job Training Center. This past year, 7 youth obtained their GED, 32 enrolled in college, 126 were employed, and 124 youth were supported in our housing options. 92% of youth graduating from Transitional Housing did not return to the streets.

The QVS Fellow will be serving as a Youth and Benefits Specialist. The goal of this position is to support homeless youth in transitioning from street life to self-sufficiency. The Youth and Benefits Specialist helps facilitate day-to-day services offered in the Day Program, a drop-in program for homeless youth. They will assist youth in accessing basic needs resources (food, showers, laundry, etc.) as well as actively work to build relationship and engage youth to access other needed resources and supports. Position responsibilities include: initial orientation of new youth; educating youth about resources and supports; crisis counseling (harm reduction counseling); assistance to ensure youth access eligible benefits (SNAP and Medicaid); supporting youth in identifying and accomplishing their goals by assisting them in successfully engaging and connecting with resources and supports; facilitating youth development activities; and tracking services provided to youth.


P:ear builds positive relationships with homeless and transitional youth through education, art and recreation to affirm personal worth and create more meaningful and healthier lives. With a staff of only 9 people, each year we serve almost 800 homeless youth ages 15-25. Located at the corner of NW6th and Flanders, p:ear has been building positive relationships with homeless youth since 2002. During that time, p:ear has been recognized for our innovative programs and approach to homeless youth, including the Lowenstein Award, Friends of Alternative Education, and the Crystal Starbright Award.

The QVS Fellow will be serving as a Kitchen and Food Manager. The Kitchen and Food Manager will serve as a positive adult role model for youth accessing p:ear, with emphasis on respect and commitment. 80% of floor staff time will be spent coordinating meals, supervising cooks and kitchen volunteers and working directly with youth, the other 20% of time will be spent on administrative, organization and housekeeping tasks. Some of the duties are: to create a safe, supportive, structured environment; abide by all policies and procedures; develop positive, respectful relationships with youth, other volunteers, staff, and local business owners; maintain appropriate boundaries; help prepare the facility each morning, clean and organize it at end of work day with an emphasis on kitchen and food areas; and participate in weekly staff meetings, monthly in-services, retreats and p:ear events.

Philadelphia Parks Alliance

Philadelphia Parks AllianceFounded in 1984, the Philadelphia Parks Alliance leads a diverse and expanding citizens’ movement which believes that great public spaces help create a higher quality of life for all Philadelphia residents. We primarily accomplish this through direct services and programming that cultivate civic engagement and community ownership in all of Philadelphia’s public spaces, especially in our most impoverished communities.

The mission of the Parks Alliance is to champion the public’s interest in outstanding parks, recreation, and open spaces - key to making Philadelphia a healthy, vibrant, and sustainable city for all. We are currently small and efficient (with a team of less than 20); but our organizational mandate is city-wide and with more than 1.5 million residents, of which 28% live below the poverty line, our expansive vision to reach every community of need makes it imperative for us to continue to grow.

As an organization, we seek to:

    • Mitigate structural poverty by creating more and better opportunities for Philadelphia residents through public space programming
    • Develop both public and private partnerships with organizations and community leaders
    • Become more widely known as a data-driven enterprise that offers our donors optimal value and our community stakeholders significant benefit.

Currently, our primary focus as an organization is on our Recreation Community Initiative. With this initiative, we develop recreation centers into comprehensive community centers that offer a variety of well-attended programming, such as ESL support, after-school tutoring, Pre-K programming, and other services at recreation centers across the city.

The QVS Fellow will serve as a Community Outreach Coordinator as a part of our Recreation Community Initiative (RCI). The goal of this initiative is to ensure that all 180 recreation centers in the city flourish with well-attended programming and a stable support system. We hold anywhere from 2-6 recreation meetings a month for which the Fellow will help lead and collect recreation center data for our database. These dinners provide a great opportunity for the Fellow to not only interact with rec leaders and advisory council members, but interact with up to 100 community members of all ages at any given time. In addition to these community dinners, the Fellow will build relationships with resource-providing partners, such as other nonprofits, Parks & Rec staff, and volunteers. Finally, the Fellow will actively canvass the corresponding rec center neighborhoods, going door to door with flyers, often personally inviting members of the community to our events.

West Philadelphia Alliance for Children

The West Philadelphia Alliance for Children (WePAC) was established in 2004 with 6 volunteers placed in 1 elementary school. Our scope and reach in providing library services and literacy programming grew in subsequent years to address the drastic closing of school libraries in response to the severe budget crisis impacting the School District of Philadelphia in 2009, that continues through today. There are currently only 5 or 6 certified school librarians for the School District of Philadelphia's 130,000 students (down from nearly 200 just 25 years ago). In fact, the vast majority of Philadelphia's 220 schools completely lack a functioning library. Enter WePAC: WePAaC provides essential, regular access to books and literacy enrichment with a simple yet effective approach: get kids excited about learning to read before they must read to learn. Through this approach, WePAC seeks to foster a love for books and reading in Philadelphia’s young students, and support literacy development through enrichment activities. Our libraries are set up to spark creativity, stoke imaginations, and encourage children’s dreams and ambitions through the written and spoken word.

Since 2009, WePAC's 170 volunteers have dedicated more than 10,000 hours annually to re-opening, supplying, and staffing volunteer-run libraries in elementary schools throughout Philadelphia. WePAC enhances the academic offerings of the schools we serve by providing library services and academic mentoring that are not otherwise available in these schools. All of our programming and services are provided during the academic year within regular school hours. WePAC currently serves approximately 4,500 students in 13 schools.

Community Engagement Specialist: WePAC relies heavily on volunteers, community partners, and families to support its mission. We seek to deepen our relationships with partner organizations, including school operators, nonprofits, advocacy groups, and civic groups. Specifically, we seek to develop strong, sustainable partnerships with a number of key stakeholders to engage volunteers and community members alike. The Community Engagement Specialist (CES) will plan and execute efforts to increase the awareness of WePAC in the communities we serve, as well as manage relationships with key partner organizations. More specifically, the CES will do outreach in the neighborhoods we serve to develop new community partnerships, recruit new volunteers, and identify opportunities for WePAC to better support the families we serve. Activities will include planning monthly service events, attending community meetings, and developing outreach materials to use with a range of audiences. The CES will report to the Executive Director, and work closely with the Program Manager, Program Development Associate, and other staff/volunteers as needed. Duties and responsibilities will include:

  • Developing and managing a grassroots outreach campaign in the neighborhoods immediately surrounding our school libraries
  • Building and strengthening external partnerships across the city to support WePAC’s efforts
  • Serve as WePAC’s ambassador at public events and community meetings
  • Run monthly service events to engage and recruit new volunteers at WePAC libraries
  • Assist with planning and executing community engagement and organizing events including: trainings, library visits, letter writing campaigns, speaking events, etc.

Having a full time person to support organizations like ours at a subsidized rate for a budget like ours was game-changing. We’re going to have another Fellow for the next cycle as well for sure…QVS Fellows are not interns and do much more than an intern could. We believe that all Fellows and interns need to be paid (and fairly), and I can’t imagine a situation for them any cooler than living in a cooperative house with OTHER Fellows also placed in mission-driven organizations around the same city.

Esteban Kelly

US Federation of Worker Cooperatives (Philadelphia)

Our QVS Fellow has allowed us to sit at more tables and join more campaigns than we would have been able to without his presence. He contributes greatly to our work on diversity, equity and inclusion, bringing skills in that area and helping us forge connections with more diverse communities. I can’t overstate how valuable this Fellow has been in enhancing our work.

Kelly Campbell

Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility (Portland)

This year having a QVS Fellow doubled the capacity of our community organizing department.

Sara Halawa

Community Action Agency of Somerville (Boston)

QVS is straight forward with very little paperwork. Over the years, the candidates have all contributed to our mission in unique ways and we have been pleased to have them as members of our team. Compared to other service programs, it is a blessing.

Melissa Klein

Habitat for Humanity (Atlanta)


(Fellow application/interview dates are subject to change- we will keep this page updated as changes are made)

  • December 1- February 1: Agencies apply to become a QVS site placement (see the online application here).
  • March 15: QVS Fellow applications due.
  • March 28 – April 16: QVS staff interview and select Fellows, assigning them to each city.
  • April 20 – May 4: Site placement agencies interview QVS candidates and rank their top choices.
  • May 4: Sites let QVS know ranking and top choices.
  • By May 9: Fellows are assigned to a site placement agency.
  • By May 23: Fellows, Agencies, and QVS sign contracts.
  • July or August: Orientation meeting for site placement agency supervisors with QVS staff.
  • Last week of August: QVS Orientation for all Fellows.
  • September 4: QVS Fellows begin work placement.

Organizational Benefits

  • QVS Fellows are energetic and committed, equipped to work in cross-cultural settings. Most are college graduates.
  • Fellows bring training in facilitation, communication, conflict resolution and anti-oppression work.
  • Fellows bring connections to other organizations through the service sites of their QVS community members.
  • QVS provides Fellows with a context for reflection and support, which strengthens their contribution to your organization’s work.
  • Partnering with QVS provides a low-cost, full time intern who has been recruited and screened by QVS and selected by your organization.

Organizational Investment

  • The cost to host a QVS Fellow is approximately $17,000 for 11 months, full time, paid monthly, or in two installments.
  • This fee assists QVS in providing the following support to Fellows: rent and utilities, a food stipend, a personal living stipend, health insurance, travel costs, as well as programmatic support such as recruitment, orientation, on-going reflection, retreats, spiritual formation and education, and regular trainings and workshops on topics such as community organizing and nonviolent direct action.
  • We also ask your organization to create, in partnership with QVS staff, a job description intended to allow the Fellow to contribute meaningfully to your organization’s mission. Your organization is also asked to provide initial training and on-going supervision and mentoring for the QVS Fellow, insuring that the Fellow remains a valuable part of your team throughout his or her placement year.
  • Two full days of each month, QVS Fellows do not work at their site placement and instead spend that time together with the other Fellows and QVS staff in retreat, training, and reflection. QVS also asks agencies to grant several “flex days” throughout the year as other training opportunities become available as a primary goal of the year is for learning and growth in the Fellows.

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